Annie Kenney

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The energy on campus is so positive, so optimistic, so collaborative, and so joyful. CRS is the type of school I wish I had gone to as a child. I believe in the progressive approach that is taught throughout CRS and the authentic way the children learn through hands-on experiences that engage them and allow them to apply what they are learning to the world around them.  

Annie joined CRS more than 20 years ago, and her current role includes science teacher for Grades 3-5. She has also coached girls field hockey and lacrosse teams and served as an Admissions Associate. Annie is passionate about integrating her students’ work in science with the thematic curriculum at each grade level. She works to interest her students in protecting the environment. As part of her curriculum, Annie undertakes citizen science projects with her students, where they collect and report real-life data to scientists; this work provides an opportunity for students to do both community service and science. Annie’s other passions include photography and sports. She earned her bachelor’s degree in English from St. Lawrence University.

Tara Jennings

Woman in purple shirt

Tara taught science at a number of schools since 2001, and prior to coming to CRS served as the Science Department Chair at Dana Hall School. During her time at Dana Hall, Tara taught courses in physical and life sciences for students in grades 9-12, served as an advisor, and was a member of the Admissions Committee and the Senior Projects Committee. Tara also taught science at the Solomon Schechter Day School of Boston, The Pennington School in New Jersey, and The Winchendon School. Throughout her career in education, she has also been a coach, middle school advisor, dorm parent, and faculty mentor, and served on a number of faculty- and student-focused committees.

Monica Chrambach

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Monica joins Charles River School from Shady Hill School in Cambridge, Mass., where she taught since 1994. Most recently, she taught science in grades 5-8 and served as an instructional coach to the middle school faculty. She has also taught eighth-grade math and lower school science, and tutored students with learning challenges. Prior to working at Shady Hill, she was a high school science and math teacher for learning disabled students at the Forman School and King & Low-Heywood Thomas School in Connecticut. Monica is particularly interested in curriculum design, affective education and meeting the needs of diverse learners.